MHEWC-III Learning Event: Are our early warning systems effective?

Session objectives

 

The Session objectives will explores: 

  1. The gaps, boundaries, constraints and limitations of MHEWS in saving lives, reducing livelihood impact and loss and damages for both extreme (sudden-onset and new creeping hazards) linked to Climate Change and or complex cascading or compounding geophysical /biological hazards? 

  1. emerging challenges of Early Warning Systems in context of both Climate Change and Urbanization’ and how to adapt EW messages to the needs of people and communities in an integrated and sustainable way 

  1. Review and solicit input on a new methodology that draws on the MHEWS checklist here New strategies and opportunities for the international community to support LDCs and SIDS measure the effectiveness of MHEWS and provide support in how we redesign/enhance MHEWS to better connect the systems to timely and appropriate Early Actions and decision making across the range of timescales? 

 

 

Guiding Questions

 

  1. What are the successes and proven benefits of effective MHEWS? 
  2. What are the gaps, limitations of MHEWS in saving lives, reducing livelihood impact and loss and damages for both extreme (sudden-onset and new creeping hazards) linked to Climate Change and or complex cascading or geophysical compounding geophysical /biological hazards?  
  3. What do you think are the emerging challenges of Early Warning Systems in context of both Climate Change and Urbanization/development trends?  
  4. How to adapt MHEWS and messages to the needs of people and communities in an integrated and sustainable way? 
  5. What are the new strategies and opportunities for the international community to measure the effectiveness of MHEWS and support how we redesign/enhance MHEWS to better connect the systems to timely and appropriate Early Actions and decision making across the range of timescales?  
  6. How can countries and communities at risk benefit from advances in science, technology, governance and community-based engagement behind early warning systems 

 

 

Expected outcomes

 

  1. Showcase how MHEWS save lives, reduce impact on livelihood, and reduce disruption to social services and infrastructure systems. 

  1. Highlight why and how early warning systems are not effective, and improve understanding of the gaps, boundaries, limitations and emerging challenges of existing MHEWS in the light of new creeping and sudden-onset hazards linked to Climate Change and complex geophysical/biological hazards. 

  1. Identification of new strategies and opportunities for the international community to further advance and enhance MHEWS for the benefit of society, in particular towards reducing not only loss of lives, but also impacts on livelihood and infrastructures etc 

  1. Introduction to/feedback on a new methodology and tool for measuring the effectiveness of MHEWS. 

Documents

Learn more

Investments in preparedness and response capacities have been significant by governments disaster management entities, development and humanitarian partners, including through increasingly uptake of anticipatory approaches linked with adaptive social protection mechanisms. Benefits of these efforts can be accounted for the recent findings of the WMO Atlas for Mortality and Economic Loss (1970-2019), which found a significant reduction in mortality related to hydrometeorological events.  However, the report also notes that there has been a significant increase in economic losses due to weather, climate and water extremes. Therefore, there is an opportunity for the international community to reconsider MHEWS design to better connect the systems to decision making across the range of timescales.

Moreover, as noted in the recommendations of the 2020 State of Climate Services – Risk Information and Early Warning Systems, more investments are needed to fill the capacity gaps, especially in LDCs (such as Africa) and SIDs for effective EWS. Furthermore, there are emerging resources to support countries in better assessing and monitoring the effectiveness of their MHEWS to ensure systems are delivering desired benefits.  Practical training and feedback on the CREWS ‘Measuring Effectiveness of Early Warning System through Sendai Framework Monitoring’ set of custom indicators were developed which provide a measure on the quality/effectiveness of MHEWS.

From stock take to scale on Target G, MHEWC-III will develop recommendations for GP2022 to enable transformation to a systemic approach to inclusive early warning and early action for all hazards to reduce impacts and losses

Are our EWS effective

Agenda

23 May 2022
12:00 - 13:30 (Bali UTC+8)

Location

Nusantara Ballroom
BICC First Floor

Online access

Remote participation available to those registered for the conference

Participation

Open to those registered for the conference

Interpretation

FR, ES

Details

Accessible
International sign
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Contact

On behalf of the co-chairs of IN-MHEWS (UNOOSA/ UN-SPIDER and WMO), mhew3@wmo.int

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